Turns out Yankees controversy, Anthony Rizzo actually helped long-haired bat boy

New York Yankees v Cleveland Guardians
New York Yankees v Cleveland Guardians / Ron Schwane/GettyImages
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Yankees Twitter, Michael Kay, and any uncle with strong opinions in the tri-state area became fascinated this week with the Yanks' bat boy in Cleveland.

The obsession was mostly because the bat boy (real name: Nate Rose) might've been the most un-Steinbrenner man in existence (except maybe Cleveland's Tuesday starter Hunter Gaddis).

Who was this man? What was his story? Were the Guardians trolling the Yankees by giving them a long-haired bat boy, thus forcing him to wear their uniform/disrupt their tradition?

The intrigue only deepened when Nate showed up to Tuesday's game looking like a muted version of himself, his long hair hidden under a new helmet (without a visible Yankees logo).

Snarky Twitter users (and yours truly) assumed that someone in the Yankees organization had embarrassingly gotten to Nate. Turns out, though, that according to Kay on Wednesday's broadcast, it was actually Anthony Rizzo's idea to hide the hair and make it even more of a "thing".

The two posed together before Wednesday's game, which brought about more good fortune for Nate.

Yankees long-haired bat boy Nate in Cleveland had Anthony Rizzo's help going viral

As it turns out, Nate is actually a drummer for a band called The Open Doors (OK, your jaws are on the floor, and that's obvious).

Thanks to his newfound fame, Kay revealed that Nate's band had booked a concert in Brooklyn for this May.

That's just a few weeks away, and we expect to see all our fellow Yankee fans there once Nate reveals the date and time.

Based on the replies to the above tweet, this thing's going to get sold out in support of a certified legend.

Be honest. When you saw Nate with his hair in a bun/obscured by a helmet, you didn't expect his conclusion to be, "The Yankees (and their fans) are cool," did you?

Score one for decency. Maybe the drumbeat of tradition is changing, even slightly.