3 Gleyber Torres trades Yankees must pursue this offseason

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - OCTOBER 23: Gleyber Torres #25 of the New York Yankees slides back into first base in the third inning against the Houston Astros in game four of the American League Championship Series at Yankee Stadium on October 23, 2022 in the Bronx borough of New York City. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - OCTOBER 23: Gleyber Torres #25 of the New York Yankees slides back into first base in the third inning against the Houston Astros in game four of the American League Championship Series at Yankee Stadium on October 23, 2022 in the Bronx borough of New York City. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images) /
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Gleyber Torres #25 of the New York Yankees (Photo by Carmen Mandato/Getty Images) /

2. Gleyber Torres to Milwaukee Brewers

The Brewers have long been a franchise known for uncovering hidden gems under the leadership of GM David Stearns, keeping Milwaukee competitive with a dominant rotation and interchangeable infielders.

The 2023 Brewers will likely look very similar to previous editions, but Stearns won’t be at the helm; the team announced on Thursday that Matt Arnold will move into the GM role, elevating Stearns to an emeritus advisory position. With a new leader in place (who should operate under the same philosophy), the Brewers could be a natural landing spot for Torres, in the wake of previous middle infield acquisitions of Willy Adames, Luis Urías and Kolten Wong.

Adames, toiling a bit in Tampa, went to Milwaukee and immediately became a star. Turns out, all his concerns about the sight lines at Tropicana Field were legitimate. Torres doesn’t need a change of scenery quite as badly, but would still make one hell of a bounce back double play partner for Adames.

How about Torres for, uh … let’s see here … breakout prospect and everyone’s favorite future No. 1 overall prospect in baseball Jackson Chourio? Just kidding … unless you want to.

In reality, a trade for young left-hander and No. 12 prospect Ethan Small, plus a lottery ticket like Milwaukee’s 29th-ranked prospect, catcher Matthew Wood, could work here.